Privacy Please

S5, E197 - Corporate AI Dilemmas Tackling Innovation with Privacy in Mind

January 26, 2024 Cameron Ivey
Privacy Please
S5, E197 - Corporate AI Dilemmas Tackling Innovation with Privacy in Mind
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Show Notes Transcript

This week on Privacy Please, discover the fine line between innovative tech and privacy pitfalls as I guide you through the complexities of generative AI in the corporate sector. Cisco's startling survey findings serve as the backbone of our discussion, revealing that a quarter of companies have pressed the panic button on generative AI tools to prevent data leaks and intellectual property breaches. You'll get a front-row seat to the latest industry moves, with tech juggernauts like Apple and Verizon leading the charge, and an exploration into the tension between AI integration and data protection. 

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Speaker 1:

Alrighty then, ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to another episode of Privacy, please. I am your host, cameron Ivy, and I got a little blogcast for you. It's been a little while. Shall we dive in, or what, or what Shall we, shall we, shall we? All right, let's do this Today.

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna be talking a little bit about shocker here generative AI. I was looking over some articles and some interesting findings from a recent survey that Cisco did. It exposes the ongoing struggle companies face in keeping their private information safe from the potential hazards of Gen AI. And no, that is not a new Gen Z, gen Q, generative AI. That is so the battle against generative AI in the corporate realm. In the wake of chat GPT's public launch, the industry giants such as Apple and Verizon made headlines by imposing bans on the use of generative AI at work. However, cisco's survey reveals that these companies were not alone in their concerns. Over 25% of companies have outright banned the use of generative AI tools, while 63% and 61% have respectively limited to data employees can input and the specific Gen AI tools they can utilize. Let's talk about the Achilles' Heal and Data Leakage. The heart of these restrictions lies in the fear that employees might inadvertently leak sensitive company information to third parties like OpenAI. A staggering 68% of respondents share this concern and emphasizing the potential risks of data misuse by external entities. Cisco's chief legal officer, dev Stalovpuf S-T-A-H-L-K-O-P-F. Sorry if I botched that Dev emphasizes the need for companies to conduct thorough AI impact assessments, highlighting the delicate balance between AI innovation and data protection, off the shelf tools and corporate headaches like desperate restrictions. The survey unveils a surprising reality here 62% of respondents have input information about internal processes into Gen AI tools. This suggests that, even with precautions in place, the popularity of the off the shelf tools like ChatGPT poses challenges for corporate privacy professionals. Indeed, it does. Companies like Salesforce aimed to capitalize on this uncertainty, offering products that promised to secure sensitive data from system storage and screen for toxicity in AI model responses Going into legal battles and intellectual property concerns.

Speaker 1:

The survey exposes another layer of anxiety for security and privacy professionals. Oh, anxiety, we all feel that as adults. You know what I'm saying Every day the fear that AI companies are using public data to train models and fringing on businesses' intellectual property. Legal battles, such as the recent lawsuit by the New York Times against open AI, highlighted the growing tension between AI development and protecting intellectual assets. Are companies unwittingly contributing to the very systems that could displace jobs and compromise proprietary information? I don't think so, but we can get into that later. In conclusion, privacy legislation as a beacon of hope. As Gen AI landscape evolves, the need for robust privacy protections becomes increasingly evident. Despite the absence of long-promised federal privacy legislation in the US, cisco's survey demonstrates that 80% of respondents believe regional privacy laws have helped their companies. Advocating for a more comprehensive legal framework, dev underscores the importance of treating privacy as a business imperative rather than a mere compliance exercise, emphasizing that organizations prioritizing privacy will thrive in this era of AI.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, that's a good one, right? I like that. Listen. This article is pretty interesting. If you wanna dive more into it, please do so. I'll share it in the notes. But I think a lesson here is that the biggest challenge in today's world and today's businesses, as we evolve, as privacy evolves, as technology evolves, it's always gonna be that question innovation versus privacy how do we balance the two? That's gonna be a challenge that forever will continue, but I think it will improve and we shall see. So next time, next week, whatever, as I mean. Thank you guys for tuning in, as always. Appreciate the support. Hope you enjoy these. Would love to hear from you. Reach out, I'm there, I'm on social media, hit me up. Anyways, just remember one thing in the world of evolving technology, privacy is always paramount, but you gotta find that balance right, because we love technology. All right, see you guys next week. Cameron Ivy, over and out.